Montag, 30. Januar 2012

Norman Bel Geddes - Science Fiction




Norman Bel Geddes


born in 1893 Michigan, USA
died in 1958 New York, USA




. studied art at the Cleveland Institute of Art and the Art Institute of Chicago.
. began his carrier with set designs for Aline Barnsdall's Los Angeles Little Theater in the 1916-1917 season, later in 1918 as the scene designer for the Metropolitan Opera in New York.
. opened an industrial design studio in 1927.
. from 1928, designed futuristic looking cars for the Graham Paige company.
. in 1929, designed "Airliner Number 4", a 9-deck amphibian airliner that incorporated areas for deck-games, an orchestra, a gymnasium, a solarium and two airplane hangars.
. published Horizons in 1932, which has a significant impact on industrial design.
. designed the General Motors Pavilion, known as Futurama, for the 1939 New York World's Fair. 
. published "Magic Motorways" in 1940, which promoted advances in highway design and transportation.
. while not widely known, designed the case for the Mark I computer.
. "Norman", written by Gerry Beckley od the band America and performed by Jeff Larson on his 2002 album Fragile Sunrise is an homage to Bel Geddes.

Famous Works:

Airliner Number 4, 1929
Cobra Lamp, 1930s, for Faries Manufacturing Company
Futurama, 1939, for 1939 New York World's Fair
Patriot Midget Radio, 1940, for Emerson Radio


Motor Car No. 8
Motor Car No. 8




Airliner No 4, 1929

Never manufactured
Having designed everything from household appliances to transcontinental trains, Bel Geddes turned his sights to the skies, creating in 1929 one of the most ambitious commercial airliner concepts ever put to paper: A nine-story flying amphibious behemoth dubbed simply "Airliner #4." Inspired by the Dornier DO-X flying boat, the aircraft -- designed in partnership with Dr. Otto Koller -- would sleep 606 passengers in cruise liner-like comfort. With a wingspan of 525 feet, the plane would have been twice the size of a modern-day Boeing 747 Jumbo Jet.
Bel Geddes' plans were the fly his plane between Chicago and London via the St. Lawrence Seaway with refueling done in flight over Canada. Although he was purportedly in negotiations in a syndicate of Chicago businessmen to fund the project, it never materialized.

ABOUT THE DESIGN:


Norman Bel Geddes (1893-1958) was one of the most influential designers of the early 20th Century.  Trained as a theatrical designer, he was the first to apply the principals of aerodynamics to industrial design, creating the style we now know was "Streamline Moderne."
Having designed everything from household appliances to transcontinental trains, Bel Geddes turned his sights to the skies, creating in 1929 one of the most ambitious commercial airliner concepts ever put to paper: A nine-story flying amphibious behemoth dubbed simply "Airliner #4." Inspired by the Dornier DO-X flying boat, the aircraft -- designed in partnership with Dr. Otto Koller -- would sleep 606 passengers in cruise liner-like comfort.  With a wingspan of 525 feet, the plane would have been twice the size of a modern-day Boeing 747 Jumbo Jet.
Bel Geddes' plans were the fly his plane between Chicago and London via the St. Lawrence Seaway with refueling done in flight over Canada.  Although he was purportedly in negotiations in a syndicate of Chicago businessmen to fund the project, it never materialized.
Although he never saw this dream take flight, Bel Geddes went on to gain fame of the designer of General Motors' celebrated "Highways & Horizons" exhibit -- better known as "Futurama" -- at the 1939 New York World's Fair.









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